Question

Are files—and file sync tools like Dropbox and Box—crucial to your work? Or could you live without traditional files?

Files are increasingly abstracted away, replaced by notes and designs and projects in modern software. You don't share a Figma design in Dropbox, or attach a Google Doc to a message; a link and a login is all you need.

Where years ago Dropbox would have played a crucial role in work, today it often feels more like an archive of completed work, filled with PDF and JPG exports from the apps where the work actually got done.

Or are files themselves still a critical part of your workflow? How do you see the future, between traditional files and the in-app content in modern business software?

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christian-alsen's avatar
9 months ago

What was said is true if you work in a digital environment. As it happens, we are working with B2B manufacturing/ supply chain people a lot & they are moving tons of files around. We even developed a product called relatico for handling files better than dropbox, ie with checklists, expiry dates, advanced communication features etc. File sharing still matters a lot in B2B.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @christian-alsen )
9 months ago

Oh interesting, thanks for sharing! And I presume this formerly would have been managed by emailing files around, and so even Dropbox is a step up in simplicity?

Attaching check lists to files is clever, so you're managing the process right alongside the content!

1 point
davidstrom's avatar
9 months ago

Call me OG, but I still work almost 100% in the world of files. And Dropbox is my go-to place to sync my Windows laptop, my Mac desktop and my iPhone so I can have access to those files across my work surface area.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @davidstrom )
9 months ago

That absolutely still makes sense—and if anything, when working cross-platform Dropbox is even more important (where OneDrive might be better for work across just PCs or iCloud might be easier when using only Apple devices).

1 point
ivmirx's avatar
@ivmirx (replying to @davidstrom )
9 months ago

Same here, Dropbox is the center of everything for me. I avoid Google Docs unless it's necessary to collaborate in real-time.

1 point
shawnyeager's avatar
9 months ago

As it happens, I was just evaluating whether or not I should delete Dropbox today. It’s all but empty, save one vendor project using Paper.

I’ve moved everything personal to iCloud and work is all Google Drive + Docs.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @shawnyeager )
9 months ago

Interesting, I'm in a similar spot. Most of our team work is in Notion, with the rest in Google Drive. Dropbox increasingly is an archive for stuff I simply haven't moved into iCloud Drive. Feels like Drobpox is in a tough spot, when its competitors in Google Drive and OneDrive come bundled into Office suites that companies almost have to use already.

2 points
DaveAustin's avatar
9 months ago

For both work and personal use, dropbox is just a storage site. We rarely use it for collaboration. That said storage is important for us and we love the ability to attempt to avoid the digital dark age risk on our photographs stored on old computers, and I do like the ability to access all docs from wherever I am.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @DaveAustin )
9 months ago

Photo sync is an eternal challenge. I've got older photos in Dropbox, iPhone photos in iCloud, camera photos in Lightroom and external drives ... and there really doesn't seem to be a perfect way to pull them all together without continuous work.

1 point
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