Question

Do you have comments on your blog—and if so, what powers them?

Do you use WordPress or Medium's default comments, direct people to comment on Hacker News or Twitter or another forum or social network, or do you use a hosted comment tool like Disqus?

Mentioned
#WordPress #Medium #Ghost #Squarespace #Webflow #Blogging
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silver's avatar
21d

We're using WordPress default comments for our blog. It actually works quite well in most cases and I find it a good way to keep track of all the useful discussions that are going on there (i.e. this post with 100+ comments)

4 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @silver )
21d

Nice to hear it's working well. Are you using the default Akismet spam filtering?

1 point
silver's avatar
@silver (replying to @maguay )
21d

Yes! The default Akismet spam filter has worked quite well. Stats say it has blocked 89,548 spam last 6 months.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @silver )
21d

That's quite a lot!

1 point
rick's avatar
21d

On all the company blogs I've managed, we've never enabled comments. The amount of spam (bot spam) and irrelevant customer support inquiries posted nearly required a full-time employee to moderate.

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @rick )
20d

Great point on irrelevant customer support. It's hard enough pulling that together from email + social nowadays.

Do you find the opposite, that without blog comments readers try sending in comments about the blog via social + email? And do you think you've missed anything on the community engagement side by not having comments?

1 point
rick's avatar
@rick (replying to @maguay )
20d

Good question! In my experience, I haven't seen anyone try to send in any comments through customer service or social media.

Interestingly, at my most recent companies, we had author biographies where some of our full-time writers included their social media profiles and email addresses. Even then, they didn't receive any customer support-type questions, just a lot of spam from SEO "consultants" requesting the addition of links to their website.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @rick )
19d

Ha oh I can imagine—I get those all the time.

1 point
imaginedesigner's avatar

I'm using Medium's default comment method.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @imaginedesigner )
21d

I love how Medium comments end up being their own posts, to a degree. It’s a unique take on the idea of keeping the “conversation” going through linked blog posts.

1 point
maguay's avatar
19d

We have comments on Capiche, powered by our internal Rails CMS, and they’ve generally worked well so far.

My previous job used Disqus comments in another custom CMS—and they worked fine, but you had to keep an eye on new Disqus features that would get enabled over time. For example, Disqus once enabled “related posts”-type ads on comments, that you had to opt out of. That, and having to use a separate app to moderate comments outside of the CMS, made it far from the best experience.

On my personal blog, I don’t have comments enabled because my CMS doesn’t support them, I didn’t want to deal with Disqus again, and social replies or email capture most of the same use-case of comments. Though not sure I’d make the same decision if I was rebuilding it today. You definitely lose out on community-building by not having comments.

1 point
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