Question

How do you help an old-school team adopt a CRM?

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alexjmedick's avatar
2 years ago

This has been my nightmare lately. I'm currently working with an old-school management team company adopt to modern-day technology. When I first started with them and did my audit, I asked for a client list and they had to export it from Quickbooks 🤦‍♂️

Right now, I'm getting them set up on Hubspot - it's really taking a lot of handholding, but luckily the training videos are there.

I started off by putting together a presentation of why is matters and how it can help them get geared up for growth. I also tailored how I would operate a CRM for their specific niche so it hits a little closer to home. Then, I put together training videos with me walking them through the software (recorded with Loom) and then set up Zoom training's where they all participated and asked questions in real-time. Lastly, I assigned them Hubspot academy training classes involving the CRM to help as a reinforcer.

It's still not easy as old-school style managers are horrible with change. They know what they need to do, but don't want to because it's new and time-consuming. So I just keep the mantra going of "You may not see the ROI instantly, but a few hours out of your week now, can save you time, headaches and increase productivity down the road."

Patience is key 🧘‍♂️

6 points
MrMikeWaters's avatar
2 years ago

I went with Spiro.ai so the CRM didn't require new processes for the team to learn and actually help them become more efficient without really trying

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @MrMikeWaters )
2 years ago

That good? What makes Spiro enough easier to use than other CRMs that it doesn't have a learning curve for new users?

1 point
MrMikeWaters's avatar
@MrMikeWaters (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

Well, it automatically logs calls/SMS/email by integrating with O365 in our case and transcribes the calls. Also picks out intent and creates the action items on your cal. This means the reps don't have to take any extra actions to capture the data relevant for reporting like a typical CRM. We also use the Voice feature for in-house reps so you know which customer is calling before you pick up allowing for routing to the correct reps. We integrated our ERP so the customer/order data is handy as you answer those calls. There are lots more features we're planning to setup but that was enough to provide enough value.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @MrMikeWaters )
2 years ago

Oh wow, that would make it pretty seamless—sounds like it basically gives you an actually smart phone app!

2 points
NBNite's avatar
2 years ago

The majority of people dislike change ; old-school folks tend to be on the extreme end of this group. When it comes to bringing people like this up to speed on a new CRM (or really any new platform), these are steps I like to take:

1 - Ensure the change is really necessary. The answer will most often be yes but it's not a good use of anyone's time to change just for the sake of change - you should be sure (and be able to articulate as simply as possible) how this change will have a tangible affect on the business and the teams overall productivity.

2 - Speak to your team. Find out what they like about their current workflow and where they face challenges. Ask them what they use on a daily basis and to list 2-3 tasks that they wish could be done more quickly. Make it a priority to incorporate these responses into the initial set-up as much as you can.

3 - Do all of the heavy lifting before presenting to the team. Onboarding a new CRM can take days/weeks/months (depending on the complexity) and it's up to the folks handling the set-up to personalize everything as much as possible, remove any non-essential views/fields/data from default views, and to try and set-up the new database in the most digestible and easy to navigate way. Better to have to add the shiny features later on than distract from the basics off the bat.

4 - Group presentation followed by individual meetings. Meet with your team and run through the basic overview of the new database as general as possible. Then have someone sit down with the old-schoolers one-by-one to ensure they're all set up well and to answer any questions they have. Touch on any of the tasks they mentioned above and how they can take advantage of the new system to streamline those.

For many, change is stressful, not fun - especially when you're talking about the central database for your business. It's not easy but if you can dummy things down enough, give people the attention they need in order to not feel lost, and focus on individual challenges that the new tool solves, you'll likely find a bit more buy-in.

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @NBNite )
2 years ago

These are great tips—things that could help people adopt almost any team software. Thanks for sharing!

1 point
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