Question

What are good alternatives to TinyMCE?

We have TinyMCE built into our SaaS service but since they were acquired a few years ago they've begun to demand much higher license fees and threatening to withhold product support. We are looking for alternatives that are similar quality and more reasonable and friendly in their approach to smaller companies. Any recommendations?

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#Websites #Design #Development #Basecamp #Gusto #Quill
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maguay's avatar
a year ago

I’d done a bunch of research into text editor tools like that a while back back, when we were considering adding a rich text or Markdown+toolbar editor. The core thing I was looking for was Markdown support, a simple, floating toolbar to make editing easy, and something that was being used by popular newer SaaS companies and thus well supported.

Of those, my favorites were Quill (from Slab, used by Gusto and LinkedIn) for a floating toolbar, or Trix (from Basecamp and Hey) for its drag-and-drop image/media support and simple toolbar (with the caveat that this was purely UI and features research, and so I don’t have experience actually implementing any of these tools).

Here are my notes on each:

Quill

Pros:

  • Keyboard shortcuts
  • Hover toolbar with “Bubble” theme: https://quilljs.com/docs/themes/#bubble, to get rid of top toolbar.
  • Supports uploading images, though not with drag-and-drop by default
  • Supports doc history and undo/redo commands
  • Has modules to add (among other things) Quill Markdown Shortcuts to turn Markdown into Rich Text as you type, and Quill Renderer to store input text in both HTML and Markdown.

Cons:

  • No drag-and-drop image support

Trix

Pros:

  • Simple, modern looking toolbar
  • Keyboard shortcuts
  • Undo/redo
  • Drag-and-drop images and file uploads

Cons:

  • No floating toolbar

Typester

Pros:

  • Simple UI with core formatting options
  • Popover editor
  • Seems fast and light.

Cons:

  • No keyboard shortcuts
  • No image support
  • Less widely used, so less support

Toast UI

Pros:

  • Extensive editor features, including tables, grid, calendar, image editor, and more
  • Supports keyboard shortcuts
  • Can render Markdown into HTML/rich text

Cons:

  • More features than we likely need
  • Designed to show a preview beside the editor
  • No floating toolbar

Other Editor Options:

4 points
evanrud's avatar
@evanrud (replying to @maguay )
a year ago

Thanks -- that's super helpful -- much appreciated!

2 points
chiragchamoli's avatar
a year ago

There are quite a few out there I remember integrating TinyMCE. You should evaluate https://quilljs.com/ it’s a really good editor and close next would be Froala.

2 points
evanrud's avatar
@evanrud (replying to @chiragchamoli )
a year ago

Thanks for the advice!

1 point
amirali's avatar
a year ago

After researching and testing many rich text editors, we've decided on Fraola. It has proper documentation, easy feature implementation, and comes with a lot of features that we need.

Before Fraola, we used Slatejs almost for a year. It's worked fine, but when you need a RICH editor, it falls short. You need to implement features on your own, and that's annoying since you need to learn and hassle with the editor.

As founders, we have more important issues than dealing with the editor and losing time with implementing features. I never thought of going with paid editor solutions, but since it saved us time and make our customers happy (by not crashing:), Fraola was a "Shut up and Take My Money" move.

2 points
evanrud's avatar
@evanrud (replying to @amirali )
a year ago

Great advice -- and I agree with some or your conclusions regarding ease of implementation to free time to focus on other issues. We'll check out Fraola, thank you!

2 points
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