Question

What are the most lowkey (hidden gem) SaaS products you use in your org?

Looking to try out some new tools now that we're all working remote!

Mentioned
#Project Management #Documents #Video Calls
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_tthias's avatar
a year ago

I'm not sure if it's hidden but it's really a GEM.

Coda has been a game changer for me. In short you can create any small app as a doc, with advanced formula, automations, buttons.

In 3 minutes you can set the basic ones as a Project Manager with task attributed to team member and a space for project documentation.
Or you can go crazy, my last one was a SMS machine. I didn't want to pay for an expensive SMS tool to reach in a weekly basis 100 people. So I create a doc for that (connected to Twilio).

Basically is like Notion but more on the automation/app side than the Wiki side.

4 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @_tthias )
a year ago

I had no idea you could build that detailed of mini-apps inside Coda. On the Twilio app, that only required using Coda and Twilio, without using anything like Zapier to connect them?

I'd picked Notion for our team partly based on its better markdown support and partly because of the way everything's shared by default in team notebooks—but Coda was a close second. I need to take it for another spin.

1 point
jmitch's avatar
a year ago

If you're working remote I'd definitely suggesting checking out Yac of course. Outside of our own product, we are massive power users of Airtable. We use it for forms, bug tracking, tracking for investor calls, and so much more. Intercom is crazy important to tracking user behavior and connecting with our customers. Hubstaff is highly underrated and we used that on the agency side for time tracking and tasks. Uberconfence is by far the best conferencing I've used, especially having the Pro plan that lets you just dial into a number any time without a prescheduled call. I use this instead of listing my cell number and it just texts me when someone is waiting for me.

4 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @jmitch )
a year ago

Airtable is amazing; easily one of the best new products of the past decade.

Interesting on Uberconference. Do you use it instead of Zoom/other video call apps, or just for inbound phone calls?

1 point
jmitch's avatar
@jmitch (replying to @maguay )
a year ago

We still use Zoom for first time calls since it integrates nicely with x.ai (another must have). However we are longtime Dialpad users and love their team so I’ve had a paid UberConference line since day one and I still find it to be the best conferencing experience

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @jmitch )
a year ago

Ah neat!

Weird funny thing on Dialpad: In the early 2000's I remember my parents using Dialpad for international calls—and it would always start up and say "Dialpad.com, a Cisco powered network" if I'm not mistaken. And then inevitably the call would be terrible thanks to what must have been dialup speeds, and you'd end up still having to pay for an international call.

And now international calls are just a normal part of life for essentially free.

1 point
MaxKaminCross's avatar
a year ago

Not necessarily a new tool but I've become a huge fan of Office365 - the sharing and collaboration features are definitely underrated. I really like not having to 'trade' any functionality of Word/Excel/etc just to collaborate with someone on Google Docs, O365 is the best of both worlds! Plus being able to save files onto the OneDrive cloud just like you're saving them to a folder is awesome for collaborating (and making sure the world doesn't end if you break your laptop lol). G Suite has a lot of the same features but if you need Excel or are at a non-Google using company O365 has been a pleasant surprise!

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @MaxKaminCross )
a year ago

Office 365 is also a surprisingly good deal compared to much of SaaS, with 1TB storage for each person on a family plan and Skype minutes and the real desktop/mobile Office apps. And on company plans, there's Microsoft Teams as well. Amazing how much they've bundled together.

1 point
MrDisinterested's avatar
a year ago

Whimsical : https://whimsical.com/

Whimsical is my latest favorite. It's got four major offerings:
1) Mindmaps
2) Sticky notes
3) Flowcharts
4) Wireframes

It has a Great UX and just a no brainer for beginners to start producing results in minutes. I use it generally for Brainstorming and creating architectures.

3 points
DimaKanbanize's avatar
a year ago

EmailOctopus - email marketing tool that connects to your Amazon S3 (via Amazon SES) hosting and costs at least x10 less than a traditional tool for the same email volume. It does lack a lot of functionality of the traditional email automation tools but the pricing starts from free and goes up to $276 for 500 000 total subscribers and unlimited emails.

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @DimaKanbanize )
a year ago

That's super cool! I'd used Sendy similarly to send emails via S3 in the past, though that's self-hosted.

How well do EmailOctopus' email designer tools work compared to tools like Mailchimp?

1 point
DimaKanbanize's avatar
@DimaKanbanize (replying to @maguay )
a year ago

Ouch :D The email designer might be the weakest point of this product, surprisingly. In my experience, things break a lot and often styles don't render properly because of a messy code. I've even had a strange issue where a URL got locked between different classes and elements they auto-add and remained in the code even after the link was deleted via the interface. Then that URL showed up in the "links clicked" reports which left me wondering for days. Overall, I'd say they have a good starting point but you'd still need to dig into code from time to time where Mailchimp is a totally worry-free universe for me.

As for Sendy, do they have A/B testing? That's one thing I really can't seem to find in the S3-based email tools.

4 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @DimaKanbanize )
a year ago

Ahh gottcha. Though for what it's worth, this week I hit something similar in Mailchimp, where there was a phantom blank list item I couldn't get rid of without switching to HTML mode. Sometimes it's better just to skip rich text and do things in code!

Sendy doesn't have A/B testing—it's pretty basic, gets the job done for bulk sending templated emails to a list but not tons more than that.

1 point
kil0ran's avatar
a year ago

Designrr chops hours and possibly days from my creative pipeline. The ability to effectively turn almost any source content into a rich PDF is just awesome for my needs. Yes, I could send the content out to an agency for conversion into a whitepaper or similar but now I've got past the slightly steep learning curve I can do most things myself. With deadlines as they are content isn't finished until the last minute and so there just isn't time for the final step of "going to press". It's a tool that repays your investment in learning it

https://designrr.io/

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @kil0ran )
a year ago

That looks really nice. I used to "publish" eBooks on Leanpub solely because their conversion tool would create MOBI files that the Kindle store accepted without complaint (whereas almost every other tool I tried would end up getting some error on the Kindle store that would require extracting and hand-editing files).

Problem there was the eBooks weren't very customizable. With Designrr, are you able to customize the templates as much as you need? Or are the default designs good enough to not worry about it?

1 point
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