Question

What digital publishing platforms do writers or content marketers use?

I spend a lot of time working with writers in the digital publishing space. I typically have been focused on some of the larger and easily monetizable platforms such as Medium, Substack, and WordPress. But I am always looking for new platforms and would love to hear about any that you have found success with (other than Quora, LinkedIn, Medium, Substack, and WordPress).

Mentioned
#Medium #Substack #WordPress #Writing #Blogging #Dropbox #Ghost #Capiche
Share
bencostantini's avatar
2 years ago

I guess Ghost is another great solution, including subscription features!

6 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @bencostantini )
2 years ago

Have you tried using their subscription tools yet? Super cool that they've built it all in; Ghost is now like Medium + Substack.

2 points
bencostantini's avatar
@bencostantini (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

I never used it myself, but I've seen a lot of great feedback on Twitter and from a few founders :)

3 points
caseybotticello's avatar
@caseybotticello (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

It is interesting, but Ghost isn't free, correct? I remember it being expensive if your articles were receiving a lot of views? Regardless, I'll check it out! Thanks for the insight!

1 point
maguay's avatar
2 years ago

I use Kirby, a flat-file CMS, for my personal blog, and at Capiche we use an in-house custom Ruby-based CMS to run everything including our blog. My previous job had done something similar with Django; prior content-focused jobs all ran on WordPress. The common denominator for Capiche and the previous company blogs are wanting something in-house that we can customize at will and tie into the rest of our product and data. Similarly with WordPress, especially a half decade ago it was perhaps the easiest way to make a custom blog with add-ons that tied into in-house data. For my personal blog, the larger consideration was ease of publishing—with my blog right now, I can just save a plain text file to my server and it's published (and until recently, could save a file to Dropbox and it would show up as a blog post minutes later. That was ideal, but broke when Dropbox killed off symlink sync).

Then, in a recent Capiche discussion about how everyone built their blogs, WordPress was still the most common with 27% of the votes, and Ghost right behind at 22%, the former more common on business/corporate blogs, the latter more with newer, personal blogs. Substack and Strapi were both mentioned by a couple people, and then there were also recommendations for Gatsby, Webflow, Eleventy, Django, and even Google Sites. Substack's the only one in that list that's a platform with a community and discovery tools; everything else is standard CMS where you're presumably building an audience via social networks, email newsletters, and SEO. It's interesting how open blogs on your own server + domain still tend to win out over the platforms for publishing because the upside of owning your audience is so much higher over the long term.

I think the sweet spot is having your primary publishing place be somewhere you own—at the very least with a custom domain so you can take your traffic with you if you ever want to move. Then treat publishing platforms as an extra distribution tool to promote content from your primary publishing method to new audiences.

4 points
caseybotticello's avatar
@caseybotticello (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

Thank you @maguay! That was a very thorough (and useful) answer!

2 points
ginoarendsz's avatar
2 years ago

I've been using Revue (www.getrevue.co) for the past three years for a personal newsletter and 160 editions in I still love the tool! They started as a personal newsletter tool but developed themselves into more publisher oriented. This change brought in new and cool companies such as The New York Times, Fast Company and TechCrunch.

If you're a publisher they have a built-in approval workflow and for example managing of ads. Their pricing is really fair and customers service is helpful as well. If you want to set up a newsletter for your agency or yourself, you can just start with the free tier. When your subscribers grow above 50 subscribers there are all sorts of pricing tiers.

PS. Their referral program lets you add 50 subscribers for free per friend-signup.

Let me know if you have more in-depth questions!

4 points
caseybotticello's avatar
2 years ago

Thanks for the insight! Will check out!

1 point
How do you manage your chat inbox?

Hey guys, first post here. As part of my work, I have to deal with and respond to a lot of incoming messages from different chats: Linkedin/WhatsApp/Signal/IG. I try to use Unreads/Archive features...

The Capiche Markdown guide.

Markdown is the most popular way to format plain text. Add common characters like asterisks and dashes to text, much like how you might format a quick store list in your notes app or add emphasis ...

The community for power users.