Question

What SaaS websites have the best pricing page, any suggestions and recommendations?

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lauren's avatar
3 months ago

The question is about pricing pages, not pricing models. As such, will focus on the marketing site for pricing vs. analyzing various pricing models. Best practices for a pricing page depends on variables such as:
(a) what your pricing model is - variable, seat based, etc.
(b) who you sell to (many personas or just one) and
(c) your pricing (ACV)
(d) your stage/maturity

Since there are dozens of variations of the above variables, I recommend to look at comps for your pricing model, stage, etc. first before casting the net across the entire SaaS universe.

Here are some examples:

For usage based pricing models, I really like Mux's pricing. They have a complex product (video streaming API) and have broken down the components and offer also a sliding scale to illustrate what the cost might be at the future customers' current usage. https://mux.com/pricing

For per seat pricing models, I've noticed Figma, Airtable, Notion, etc. all have very similar if not identical designs for their pricing pages. They all have a free / starter plan for $0//month that is feature limited. They also all have a priced organization/enterprise plan. They also show all prices per month but based on an annual payment to encourage upfront commitment and cash flow.

8 points
Wahidtashkandi's avatar
@Wahidtashkandi (replying to @lauren )
2 months ago

Making it really hard to contribute to this thread with the above-detailed response haha.

What's interesting to me is we've also seen how pricing pages have different levels of impact on some of your underlying metrics like Chargeback rate, Refund rate, customer support tickets, churn and so forth.

So really important to factor those in when you're making changes (No point converting more if you end up losing that very money).

Couple examples I'd share are (Totally biased because it was either myself or team who worked with them on it):
https://www.framer.com/pricing/
https://pro.iconosquare.com/plans-and-pricing

Oh and another thing. I've never seen a SaaS company not benefit from localising their pricing page currency wise.

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @Wahidtashkandi )
2 months ago

Do you have any great examples of SaaS that you think did an exceptional job at localizing their pricing?

1 point
Wahidtashkandi's avatar
@Wahidtashkandi (replying to @maguay )
2 months ago

So there's two layers to localisation. One is the simple fact of showing local currency like https://www.remove.bg/pricing aka Cosmetic Localisation.

The other is accounting for purchasing power and adjusting your actual pricing aka True Localisation. Big Mac Index is the main example everyone knows but for SaaS it doesn't work.

Need to factor in the first two points @lauren mentioned.

(a) what your pricing model is - variable, seat based, etc.
(b) who you sell to (many personas or just one)

For example, an enterprise B2B tool can price similarly in Brazil as it does the US. However, a prosumer tool for marketing professionals needs to factor in the wage and budget difference for Brazilian marketers compared to American ones.

Evernote.com seem to do this well but I don't have actual insight into their actual performance.

1 point
jcfuller's avatar
@jcfuller (replying to @maguay )
2 months ago

Dropbox Business and Google GSuite do a great job with clear pricing. Works well across Geos (in Stripe's case, they're largely % based, but what's nice is the hero logos for customers change based on region, i.e. US customers on stripe.com, japanese customers on stripe.com/en-jp/. Dropbox does a great job localizing pricing too.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @lauren )
3 months ago

Great points on why one size doesn't fit all with pricing pages!

Mux is a great example for usage-based pricing; thanks for sharing!

2 points
siddxxvii's avatar
@siddxxvii (replying to @lauren )
2 months ago

I liked mux pricing page something really different but looks very effective. Thanks for suggestion

1 point
jeanniesarah-'s avatar
3 months ago
5 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @jeanniesarah- )
3 months ago

What do you like most about their pricing page?

1 point
UXGuy's avatar
3 months ago

I would like to suggest Notion - https://www.notion.so/pricing

Really like to simplicity of features per package, quick and easy to read and fully understand at a glance.

4 points
maguay's avatar
3 months ago

Two I see as inspirations, from the perspective of being clear and upfront with users about costs:

  • Netflix, which doesn't have a /pricing page, but does show pricing as part of their signup flow at netflix.com/signup/planform, and in FAQs on the bottom of their main landing page. The things they do great here are clearly listing what each plan offers, and emphasizing that you can cancel anytime (something we're a big fan of at Capiche, and wrote more about in The case for encouraging churn). Netflix also recently was in the news for automatically stopping payments if you aren't watching in a given timeframe, which is extremely consumer friendly.
  • Basecamp. Their product has only two plans: A $99/month unlimited plan, and a free plan for 3 projects. But the top of the page focuses only on the core paid plan, which clearly lists everything offered, and then the free plan gets an equally detailed listing underneath. They're not hiding the free plan, and they're not leaning on the free plan to make their product sound cheaper than it is. And, the default pricing showed is actual month-to-month pricing, instead of showing the annual plan's average price per month as many apps do now.

Both are great examples to follow in building consumer-friendly pricing pages.

2 points
shankarganesh's avatar
@shankarganesh (replying to @maguay )
3 months ago

I came here to say Basecamp!

3 points
siddxxvii's avatar
@siddxxvii (replying to @maguay )
3 months ago

Thanks so much for providing the suggestions

2 points
nathockens's avatar
3 months ago

I like the pricing page at TalentLMS
https://www.talentlms.com/prices

  1. There's a free option.
  2. Pricing is obvious, up front and clear. No sneakery around extra fees.
  3. No need to put down other competitors or deposition the competition.
  4. Added FAQs at the bottom of the page for further insight.
2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @nathockens )
3 months ago

Wow they have a lot of plans! Do you find that confusing? I wonder if more direct user number + features needed pricing could work better here.

1 point
FaisalBoukhari's avatar
3 months ago

I like https://mention.com/en/pricing/

1-Four different packages based on usage and seats from Free to Enterprise. Simple and clear.
2- Highlight some great customers logo that use Mention.
3-"Ask for your personalised demo" section.
4- Added FAQs at the bottom.

2 points
sonix15's avatar
3 months ago

One pricing page that I recently saw and loved was Font Awesome (www.fontawesome.com). It was very clear and easy to compare. Loved it.

2 points
StelKapa's avatar
3 months ago

Zapier (https://zapier.com/app/billing/plans) cause they have one of the best Usability-based pricing strategies. They hook you up with 100 free tasks and 5 Zaps and as soon as you start using them you want more and more. Hotjar is another example that does that, but i think Zapier's execution is much better.

2 points
siddxxvii's avatar
@siddxxvii (replying to @StelKapa )
2 months ago

I agree zapier pricing is simple and to the point.

1 point
siddxxvii's avatar
2 months ago

Just want to another point on my question above, so i am looking for inspiration on a pricing page design for my company's price page, we have 5 services and all 5 have different pricing for B2B, so trying to keep the page simple yet informative

Also thanks all for suggestions, i am going through each of your suggestions and its helping alot.

1 point
mrrolfe's avatar
2 months ago

I'll nominate https://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/pricing

Although many have their own opinions on Jira - I've used their pricing page many times in the past when illustrating concept of volume discounts to startups I work with. It is something that customers ask for a lot and the Jira team made a very simple straight forward tool for their customers to:
1) Select your plan
2a) Set the number of users you need OR
2b) Use the slider to see how the price will change based on the volume you need

It gives the user control over how they want to explore the pricing and lays it all out on the table. Simple, easy to digest and oddly satisfying user experience.

1 point
NBNite's avatar
2 months ago

I think the Monday.com pricing page has an excellent pricing breakdown/format that companies looking to move in this direction should follow:

1) Digestible Tiers - The ability to differentiate between the different tiers in one window is a must, especially when it's broken down by the features function (ie. essentials, advanced, security, support).

2) Interactive Pricing - Pricing that changes depending on the # of users chosen and the payment plan selected (monthly vs annually). Including % savings on the annual plan is a bonus

3) Feature descriptions - beside each feature is a small pop-up that briefly touches on the feature itself. All too often you see all of these additional features that are included in higher-tiered packages but are unsure of what they actually do for you.

4) On-brand format - Colors, fonts, and the design itself are all on brand; you get a sense of the platforms UI just by visiting the pricing page

5) FAQ's - You'll likely have questions. It's also likely that others have asked the same ones. A quick rundown of those questions and answers nearby is essential.

And most importantly - a CTA to begin a free trial. Easily accessible. In several places throughout the page.

1 point
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