Question

What tools do you use in your morning news consumption routine?

Any newsletters or aggregation/curation methods you like best to sift through the noise of what's important/impactful?

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#folk #around #Stick
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shankarganesh's avatar
2 years ago

I use Reeder. I've been using Feedly for a long time but recently settled with Reeder. Reeder is a minimal looking but feature-rich Mac app that has helps you stay on top of blogs and news sources without distractions.

I've organized the sites I follow into folders in Reeder (folders like product management, startup news, etc.). I also have a folder called 'Must-read'. On the days I'm busy, I just catch up with what's on the 'Must-read' folder. On other days, I sift through the rest of the content.

Some blogs publish a lot of updates (in the hundreds). When I read such blogs on Reeder, I just quickly glance through all the posts, and handpick just a couple posts and read them completely :)

4 points
maguay's avatar
2 years ago

Like @shankarganesh, I use Reeder to check RSS feeds (which sync with Newsblur), which I use to keep track of tech sites, product blogs, and favorite writers. I then get a lot of email newsletters, which I have auto-organized into a list of news in my email app (Superhuman, though you can do the same in Gmail) to get through those quickly.

For world news, I tend to check The Economist Espresso in the morning for a quick overview, and otherwise see whatever pops up on Twitter. I check the Asian Nikkei Review for Asian news, and The SF Minute for Bay Area news. And I keep track of Twitter using Nuzzel, which curates the links that the most people in my network share on Twitter and sends them as an email (which shows up in my inbox alongside the other email newsletters).

4 points
ivan's avatar
2 years ago

I use a combination of RSS feeds and email subscriptions. I find the concept of email newsletters with curated content extremely useful. Seldomly do I need to click-through to read a full story, as just the blurbs provided are enough to be as informed as I want to be, unless it's a particularly interesting subject.

So I read some one Inside.com newsletter (used to read a lot of them but decided to cull my consumption heavily), and News Items by John Ellis. Also The Information, which is paid and I can't afford it, but sometimes they have free articles or enough free info that's interesting. Those are the most relevant ones for me I think. I also tried Mailbrew for a while but found it was mostly fluff for my liking.

2 points
mgorodokin's avatar
@mgorodokin (replying to @ivan )
2 years ago

Thanks for this very helpful feedback, Ivan!

Slightly shameless plug here, but I'm launching Byte News (www.bytenews.co) in July that does just that for audio, thought you might be interested. We aggregate RSS feeds, summarize stories into 30-45 second audio blurbs, provide multiple sources to click through to, and curate a daily digest to your preferences. Would love to chat more about how you think you could improve your morning routine!
Best, Mitch

2 points
briana9's avatar
2 years ago

I've spent a fair bit of time customizing my Twitter feed and lists to filter to the most important news. IMO there's no one tool out there that is quick to setup to cut through the noise. I use a few email newsletters as well, but find that I will read it for a few months, want a break from that focus area for a few months and then often that newsletter falls by the wayside. For instance, I was into the Skimm for about 6 months or so, but completely forgot about it for like a year and still haven't signed up again.

Other than that, I honestly just listen to NPR. I feel like they do a solid job of curating news on a national/international level.

2 points
Livenadav's avatar
2 years ago

My 3 "wake APP" news sources I use every morning:

Twitter. Nuzzle. Stoop.

Twitter is for my #1 "what's trending" on the news and social media. source so this is what I go with my 1st cup of coffee.

Twitter logo mug

Nuzzle is getting the best out of twitter, because unlike Twitter newsfeed algorithm, Nuzzle gives me the best content that my followers RT. So I find Nuzzle as a better relevant & interesting feed to read, if I'm bored from my twitter feed.


"Nuzzel provides industry news and media intelligence to busy professionals."

Nuzzle

You can get "friends' feed" or even "friends of friends" or if you want to zoom out "The best of... everything" which is basically Twitter "greatest hits" in real time! so on your 2nd cup of ☕, you already on the loop of the latest news - align to your friends that already RT those news you read.


And last but not least...

Stoop.
Stoop is something I took for a test drive and fell in love. 💗 the app takes your newsletters AWAY FROM YOUR INBOX (gr8 for "inbox zero" addicts!) and put it into UI of a newsfeed. So you can scroll your 3rd cup of ☕ on the latest news from your Product Hunt daily newsletter or NYC morning Briefing.

2 points
mercurialsolo's avatar
2 years ago

I use a combination of my feeds connected to my slack account. For each feed I have a small parser, setup which looks for my topics of interests.
Have setup a Slack bot which posts parsed links to on a private slack channel (I am the only member here along with the bot).

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @mercurialsolo )
2 years ago

That's a super cool setup, with a whole Slack account for personal stuff! Do you have bots to put email newsletters or anything else into that Slack?

2 points
mercurialsolo's avatar
@mercurialsolo (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

Currently working on a chrome plugin which can track the pages which I read and send them to the parsing bot . Over a period of time hope to have a reader which I can look at and tweak attention settings of. All of my emails are forwarded to the bot and subscription emails are further posted into my slack channel.

2 points
tbriccetti's avatar
2 years ago

The Skimm is great. They give high-level summaries with just right right of depth, and the email gets sent out every morning. Plus there is a bit of humor and light heartedness in their style which is much appreciated!

2 points
craigett's avatar
2 years ago

I used to rely mostly on Twitter for my daily news sourcing but over time I found it to be too challenging to separate the signal from the noise without active maintenance. I now rely almost exclusively on a small set of newsletters, all of which are at least partially written through. My morning newsletters tend to be more relevant to business or my work in media - Dylan “Byers Market”, Morning Consult, Protocol, Axios Markets, Digiday, DailyBeast AM Cheat Sheet - whereas the end-of-day newsletters provide a much broader take on the day’s national and international news - NextDraft by Dave Pell.

2 points
vipulsatya's avatar
2 years ago

Combination of Stoop, Instapaper and Reeder.
Stoop: Day starts with stoop and going through the emails I'm subscribed to, like others have mentioned - most of the times the blurb is enough, where I need to dive deep I save the link to instapaper
Next is Reeder - this is where I skim through the blogs / websites I'm subscribed to (and these aren't your usual 9to5mac, TheVerge etc but other blogs - think Ben evans, elad gil etc - hence daily posts aren't that many)
Next is Instapaper where I attempt to go through the links I saved previous day

and then rinse. repeat.

2 points
avatar
anonymous
2 years ago

Lately I have enjoyed living inside a particular news organisations orbit. Its been nice to get into their routines and cycles. I have spent 3 months with The New Yorker, The Spectator (UK) And now The Atlantic.

The Atlantic iPad app is particularly enjoyable, as it presents you with stories around a particular topic each day. Yesterdays topic was Homelessness and lack of control, today's story is 'The Future of Indoor Life'.

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to anonymous )
2 years ago

Great idea; I did the same with The Economist's apps for a bit. I've read quite a few great longform pieces from The Atlantic recently, so may have to try their iPad app. Thanks for the suggestion!

2 points
Soids's avatar
2 years ago

My morning routine is the only thing I've found a personal assistant useful for, I currently use Google but I'm sure they all do it the same. The get-in-the-shower alarm goes off, once dismissed it goes: NPR Morning Edition, The Indicator (by Planet Money), then something very short which I keep switching around (This day in history or one minute science). That's it for non-tech news for me. For text-based, I'm still using Feedly on the phone but after years and years of adding and pruning RSS feeds I'm down to just reading Ars Technica. I agree with @ivan, the email newsletters are now adding more value compared to years past, but I haven't sought out too many yet.

1 point
Drjonessf's avatar
2 years ago

I use a combination of email newsletters, (like Jason Calcanis’ inside series), a RSS aggregator (the Early Edition - I love the old school newspaper feel), Flipboard and Nuzzel.

1 point
czhang1919's avatar
2 years ago

A combination of email subscriptions, Flipboard notifications, and qucik read throughs of select news outlets (WSJ, NYT). Flipboard is a fantastic consolidator of news from across sources (individually I wouldn't have found on my own), and the notifications are curated based on your interest. When it comes to ingesting news, I either want to be a mile deep in a narrow scope / topic or I want to read quality content from quality reporters (Flipboard addresses the first need and skmming through select news sources addresses the second need).

And as mentioned below, email subscriptions are a fantastic way to read targeted content and saved time; I also seldom find myself having to read through the entire article after reading a quality summary one-liner in the email.

1 point
Florndr's avatar
2 years ago

I used to test Feedly, Flipboard, email newsletter and much more other solutions. However, the best stays Twitter. If you want to stay on track with live update you can set up it. If you want to go above the noise you can too thanks to Twitter lists. That’s why the combo Twitter app + Tweetdeck on desktop appear IMO to be the best solution and avoid us to download tone of different apps.

1 point
camerongraham's avatar
2 years ago

Morning Brew + Hackernews is a great start!

1 point
m-bizzari's avatar
2 years ago

I subscribe to a variety of news letters from crunchbase, accelerated, wallstreet journal, and femstreet. From a world perspective I start my day listening to NPRs up first to give some global context to stories I see on these newsletters. I also listen to Robinhood's Snacks Daily to get a hot take on major tech and business happenings. Femstreet is a new one I have really come to enjoy. It is focused on women in tech and venture capital which I find produces and curates a lot of content that relates to me.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @m-bizzari )
2 years ago

You just reminded me, the business news curated inside Robinhood's app is a pretty good way to keep up with the companies you follow, too.

1 point
jaisajnani's avatar
2 years ago

I’ve switched to e-mail newsletters exclusively during COVID. I’m no longer listening to podcasts as there is no more commute, and have time in the morning to crunch through a wide set of newsletters. It’s been helpful to have a separate e-mail to direct all newsletters to and keep news separate from work - I clear this inbox out and delete all reads/unreads daily or weekly.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @jaisajnani )
2 years ago

I've never found a great way to fit podcasts into working from home; only tend to listen to them in times when I'm traveling alone, which is rare this year so far.

Got any new newsletters you've subscribed to recently that you like?

1 point
siddxxvii's avatar
2 years ago

I use winno app, its super fast, simple and the breaking news notifications are faster than any other app i have tried. The other i would recommend is Morning Brew, its not an app but each morning youll get a sum of the news and topic you want and its pretty good.

1 point
anartam's avatar
2 years ago

I use Stoop in box. Stoop in box is an app for aggregating newsletters. I have spent several days looking for an app capable of organizing all my newsletters, until I came across Stoop in box (probably reading Product Hunt, but I don’t remember for sure). The idea is quite simple: Stoop in box provides an email you can use to subscribe to newsletters and it also provides a curated list of newsletters as well. You can add youtube videos, if you want, but I stick to just newsletters.
You get your newsletters apart from your regular email. You can save newsletters and links for reading later. There’s also a dark mode, specially useful for those who like reading at night. I was so, so happy for having found that app that I subscribed for a premium version.
I think this is way better than RSS feed apps, like Feedly, for example, or bookmark apps like Pocket.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @anartam )
2 years ago

Wow, a curation app for email newsletters sounds very cool. Does it connect to your normal email account and pull newsletters out, or do you subscribe to newsletters inside the app?

2 points
anartam's avatar
@anartam (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

It doesn’t connect to a normal email account. You are given a “new” email. You can subscribe to some newsletters directly from the app. For other newsletters, you just need to subscribe using the email created by stoop inbox. The company is now presenting itself as a podcast app, but for newsletters. Just check the website Stoop inbox

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @anartam )
2 years ago

Gottcha, that'd take a bit of work to move subscriptions at first, but would be more secure over the longterm.

1 point
buzzertoursorcer's avatar
2 years ago

I'm a huge fan of The Browser, which scours the web for excellent articles, usually new, but not always. https://thebrowser.com/

I find Matt Levine's 'Money Stuff' newsletter to cover a wide variety of economic topics of interest.

To keep up to date on US political news without having to crawl too many sites I subscribe to 'What the Fuck Just Happened Today.' https://whatthefuckjusthappenedtoday.com/

Other than that a quick skim of CBC, Washington Post, and the New York times for general news. As well as Google Alerts for particular topics of interest.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @buzzertoursorcer )
2 years ago

Matt Levine is an internet treasure. I always manage to both learn stuff form his newsletters and come away entertained.

The Browser looks interesting; their example articles have quite a wide variety of topics. I'll have to try that out, thanks for sharing!

1 point
buzzertoursorcer's avatar
@buzzertoursorcer (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

You're very welcome. I enjoy the Browser a lot since they dig into a wide variety of interesting topics I don't have the time to fully hunt out on my own.

1 point
nyseans's avatar
2 years ago

Typical morning news consumption is: skim personalized Google news for any eye-catching headlines, skim some/read some email newsletters that came out today from some aggregators (eg Morning Brew, Today in Tech by AngelList, Stratechery), then check my Google news alerts.

1 point
dave's avatar
2 years ago

Technology news - Hacker News.
Started by a YC founder. It's a content aggregation forum with a similar feel to reddit. The community is mostly folks in IT, so content that rises to the top is related to technical topics. You'll also find as much useful information in a posts comments as the post itself.

Political news - Real Clear Politics

The site shares popular, current articles from many well known media outlets. It purposefully places articles from all side of the political spectrum together. It's a nice way to get opinions on topics that don't align with your own.

General news - BBC World Service Podcast

Two hours of content (with some overlap) posted daily. BBC gives a global perspective on local issues, and you'll hear about huge stories from around the world US news doesn't report on. They always report the facts and make it clear when they're introducing editorial bias into a segment.

1 point
RydalWilliams's avatar
2 years ago

I use a combination of Feedly and Flipboard. Feedly I use mainly on desktop/laptop and Flipboard is only on my phone. I find myself drowning in the noise of everything social network and as an entrepreneur, I need to absorb, skimmed, and move fast.

My feedback for Feedly is great, works well, however, I'll love to see a feature that helps remove duplicate feeds as I sometimes find myself reading the same thing from different groups which can be painful. In short simpler ways to manage my subscriptions.

Similarly to Flipboard, I do like the flow and how quickly I can navigate the content, however, it drives me mad when I stumble upon a page that after a couple of sentences it requests that I pay or join. The only change I have here is for a way to eliminate or exclude paid content from my listings, so any site that requires membership doesn't show up on my feed.

I'm sure that there are several new tools that may be better but as a creature of habit, I've been using these for years and they are engrained in my flow. Lastly, I do use the news app that is built into my FireStick, great for when I'm doing other things and don't have the option to stare at a screen.

1 point
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