Question

What Web-based SaaS product do you use daily and more than 4 hours per day?

Is there any Web-based SaaS product you use for your day job or personal work, at least 4 hours per day?

Is it forced (you're mandated to) or value-based (it's crucial for the problems that you're trying to solve)?

Do you use it on your own, or it's a company-wide choice or a standard?

If latter and you are a people manager, does the team use it too?

Thanks!

Mentioned
#Jira #Zendesk #CRM #Customer Support #Sales #Documents #Analytics #Project Management #Accounting #Marketing #Business Intelligence #Design #Finance #HR #Development #Automation #Productivity #Learning management system #Forms and Surveys #Knowledge Base #Customer.io #Desk #Front #GitHub #Google Analytics #Heap #Help Scout #Notion #Zoom #Superhuman #WordPress #Ghost #Google Docs #Slack #Whimsical #Grammarly #Spike #Figma #LinkedIn Sales Navigator #Spotify
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maguay's avatar
almost 2 years ago

I use SaaS all day—though increasingly, the web-based software I use the most has "native" desktop apps (albeit powered by Electron, so they only half-way count as native, half-way as web apps). Slack, Notion, Figma, and Superhuman all fall in this bucket, and even Zoom counts as it has a web app even if the desktop app is default. I could use them in the browser, and they're where a lot of my work happens, but I use their desktop (or iOS) apps by default. Notion gets used a lot, since it's where our project planning, notes, research, and more live.

Of stuff I use in the browser, I use Front for customer support, Google Docs for editing copy, our internal CMS (for a significant part of the day) and Ghost to publish content, Customer.io for marketing messages, Google Analytics and Heap for stats, GitHub for code collaboration (again, though, often through its desktop app), and more. Rarely am I in any of those apps for 4 solid hours a day, but together these and the desktop counterparts above fill up the day.

At different points I've used other SaaS in the browser for a significant part of the day, including Desk and Help Scout support tools when doing more customer support, WordPress when running a WordPress-powered site, and more.

4 points
Hsubaru's avatar
almost 2 years ago

Notion — all meeting notes and docs go into it!

4 points
ChibuzorObilom's avatar
almost 2 years ago

Notion and Slack - for meetings and documentation.

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @ChibuzorObilom )
almost 2 years ago

Curious, do you use them in your browser, or in their desktop apps?

1 point
ChibuzorObilom's avatar
@ChibuzorObilom (replying to @maguay )
almost 2 years ago

I use them on desktop 99% of the time.

2 points
finch's avatar
almost 2 years ago

I would say Adspert for PPC Optimization. It is value-based SaaS, at least for me. It works for Amazon Ads, Google Ads, Yandex, and Microsoft Ads. I can see all of the details, improvements on one screen, which is excellent.

3 points
AmandaSabreah's avatar
a year ago

Notion, Slack, and Figma here. Using them all on desktop apps - not in browser.

The only other tool would be Hubspot, which I do use in browser.

3 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @AmandaSabreah )
a year ago

It's fascinating how many of the most popular business web apps now have desktop apps that ... for the most part are the same as their online counterparts, but it still feels more convenient to use them in a dedicated app instead of yet another browser tab.

3 points
dynamicdynamics's avatar
@dynamicdynamics (replying to @maguay )
a year ago

Agreed. Not-a-browser-tab is the big advantage of the desktop app, especially things that are long running and have a specific context I don't want to lose.

Slack, for example, I want to be where I left off when I come back an hour later. Same with Spotify, where if I were to close the tab by accident doing something unrelated, it would be an interruption.

Contrast that with reviewing a PR in GitHub, which I do in a focused block of time, and works fine in the browser.

1 point
tng's avatar
a year ago

In order of time spent:
1. The Browser Company's browser (private beta; life changing!)
2. Roam Research (all to-dos, meeting notes, and research)

2 points
davidkylechoe's avatar
a year ago

Very similar to many of the folks here:

Notion (browser) + Slack (Desktop) + Hubspot (browser) + is LinkedIn Sales Navigator a SaaS tool? if so that too haha

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @davidkylechoe )
a year ago

I guess technically even Netflix and Spotify are SaaS in the strictest definition of "software as a service" :)

2 points
Sivan's avatar
almost 2 years ago

I use Spike (I also work there) and we use the integrated notes and docs to collaborate on everything with my team.
- We manage all our tasks/to do lists and share it with the team, so we all know what the team is working on.
- Integrated notes to collaborate on content, social media management, creative briefs, meeting notes and sharing all image and video files from the design team.
- Use it for all our internal and external video calls.
- Different group chats for a variety of topics
- Integrated calendar to manage all our events/ meetings etc.

So its safe to say we use 1 tool for 4+ hours a day.

2 points
seth's avatar
almost 2 years ago

Google Meet is used well over 4 hours a day for all meetings. Followed by Hubspot and Slack combined at 2+ hours.

1 point
benkopf's avatar
almost 2 years ago

Figma and Roam primarily (being a designer and alt- GTD practitioner. Whimsical and Miro, Azure DevOps and Jira, and other small utilities.

1 point
JeffJobs's avatar
almost 2 years ago

Google Docs to write blog posts and Grammarly to check them. Also Notion to manage my entire business.

1 point
Shirapodr1's avatar
almost 2 years ago

I use Spike for both my day job and personal account!
It's a conversational email meaning it displays all of your conversation in a chat- like form, saving you from a clunky inbox, filled with confusing threads..

You can quickly and easily collaborate with those both inside and outside of your organization because its open-silo, meaning that even non-spike users can communicate with you (not like other messaging or communication apps where both parties need to use the same service). Spike is really great for organizing multiple accounts since you can view your inbox as either unified or by account!

there are also some really great features for collaborative work like video calls, group chats and collaborative online notes and tasks :)

1 point
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