Question

What's your favorite tool to send email newsletters?

Mailchimp's incredibly popular, and there are a wide range of new apps to send paid email newsletters. What would you recommend for someone starting a new email newsletter?

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#Mailchimp
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rarjunpillai's avatar
a year ago
Hubspot

we use Hubspot's marketing automation platform for sending email newsletters. It is easy, analytics is good. Since it is closely integrated with the CRM, all the contacts are already there. No need to import/export etc.

12 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @rarjunpillai )
a year ago

Very cool. Between you and @jmitch, looks like there just may be a new trend of sending email newsletters from your CRM.

9 points
jmitch's avatar
a year ago
Intercom, oddly enough

For us, we already have all our users in Intercom. We find their segmentation and triggers are much better than most dedicated newsletter products too. It might be unorthodox but it works really well

10 points
jamoses92's avatar
@jamoses92 (replying to @jmitch )
a year ago

I love seeing creative answers like this. Never would’ve thought Intercom was stealing market share from dedicated newsletter providers. Capiche is great! Keeps me on my toes and up to date on valuable industry trends.

5 points
NickAtLoot's avatar
@NickAtLoot (replying to @jmitch )
a year ago

Agreed. Intercom really undersells the power of combining triggers and conversion goals with their email newsletters.

4 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @jmitch )
a year ago

That's clever—saves on paying for both an email newsletter and a CRM tool, and keeps all your data in one place.

2 points
awwstn's avatar
@awwstn (replying to @jmitch )
a year ago

Interesting. I have never even thought about doing it it this way.

2 points
awwstn's avatar
a year ago
Mailchimp, Customer.io, Substack

I think for general company newsletters, Mailchimp is the best. It's robust and easy to use, and users trust them + their unsubscribe functionality.

For anything with more dynamic content, Customer.io is fantastic. My one issue with it is that they don't allow unsubscribe lists, so you can't let a user unsubscribe from newsletters without unsubscribing from transactional emails (assuming you're also using them for transactional)

For a personal newsletter, Substack is great. They give you a landing page, a clean archive, and easy to use tools, all for free. And if you want to, they make it easy to earn subscription revenue from your readers.

8 points
alexjmedick's avatar
@alexjmedick (replying to @awwstn )
a year ago

I'll definitely give Substack a look for my next project. Thanks for adding it to the list.

5 points
samantha____a's avatar
@samantha____a (replying to @awwstn )
a year ago

I noticed this on the customer.io website: "For transactional use cases (password resets or invoices, for example), you can override this default setting, by flipping this switch in the Global Settings of your workflow:" (re. the unsubscribe)

https://customer.io/docs/unsubscribes

Did you try this out?

3 points
awwstn's avatar
@awwstn (replying to @samantha____a )
a year ago

I think that allows you to remove the unsub, which we probably should do for some things, but what we wanted is the ability for a user to be subscribed to a certain type of email (e.g. notifications) but unsubscribed from another type (e.g. marketing). @maguay, do you remember what we discovered here?

2 points
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @awwstn )
a year ago

Yup basically what we found is that Customer.io lets you override unsubscribes and send emails to people even if they unsubscribed. Which somewhat makes sense for transactional and account-focused emails but risks being marked as spam. What'd be better is if you could have a list of things people are subscribed to, and let people choose which emails they want to keep getting when they unsubscribe—or perhaps to have copy on the unsuscribe page state that you'll still receive product notifications.

Customer.io suggests a workaround of having people click a unique link to unsubscribe, then have Customer.io filters watch for people who clicked that link and not send to them (https://customer.io/docs/multiple-subscription-types). That could work but isn't a true unsubscribe and would get hard to maintain fast.

1 point
samantha____a's avatar
@samantha____a (replying to @maguay )
a year ago

Okay, got it. Super interesting. I really appreciate the insight. This is something I would've discovered only after integrating and using the tool for months... you saved me a lot of time!

3 points
giohobbins's avatar
a year ago
Klaviyo + Matcha for content

We've seen folks in ecomm generate a lot of revenue using Klaviyo to get in front of their customers and subscribers with segmented newsletters. Klaviyo hooks up with Shopify and other ecomm platforms so you can send emails based on customer behavior and product preferences.

But it's hard to send a lot of emails if what you're sending is only product and discounts - you get subscriber fatigue and more unsubs.

The key is to send valuable content your customers like. Tools like Matcha make it easier to source relevant, ready-to-deploy content to stay in front of your customers without annoying them.

6 points
maguay's avatar
a year ago
TinyLetter, WordPress or Ghost, and Substack

The simplest way to send email newsletters is with TinyLetter, a MailChimp-powered service that lets you send simple text emails to your subscribers. It's quick and easy to use, you don't need to worry about email templates or formatting or anything else, it's just an easy way to essentially write letters to subscribers. It's free, though only lets you add 5,000 subscribers before you'd need to switch to full MailChimp.

Then, if you're blogging anyhow, both WordPress.com and Ghost recently added email newsletter tools to share your blog posts via email right from your CMS. WordPress' tool is free; Ghost's tool is built around their paid subscription tool where you can charge for subscriptions to your blog and newsletter together, but also supports free newsletters.

Substack then is the cool new kid on the block—and the other best free option. You can start an email newsletter complete with a landing page and signup form for free. Then as your newsletter grows if you want to monetize it, you can charge for your newsletter and Substack takes a percentage of your earnings instead of directly charging for your email newsletter. It's a bit more complicated than TinyLetter, but still generally easy to use and keeps the focus on your writing.

4 points
ericjmurphy's avatar
a year ago
HubSpot - what's the point otherwise?

We come across clients using just about every Email Newsletter tool there is, and without exception, we see a huge improvement from the very first send from HubSpot. As a 'system of engagement' - HubSpot's tools are excellent - very easy to use and all integrated with each other. As a 'system of record' - having your marketing and sales emails coming directly from your CRM gives you an ability to be smarter on targeting and personalisation. As a reporting system, you can see what 's happening live, alerting sales to lead activity in real-time, as well as attribution reporting across your entire marketing and sales activity. If you want to really 'level up' you can add SeventhSense to your HubSpot email sends and personalise the delivery times to individuals.

While Email marketing is powerful, it's a reality that the only upward trend is in Unsubscribe. You need every trick in the book to drive success out of it. HubSpot is that book.

3 points
jamoses92's avatar
a year ago
More People Using Substack

While I haven’t personally used Substack, I see many more founders, operators, and domain experts embracing the platform for distribution - they’re building a valuable community of content creators. Mailchimp is the obvious incumbent, but the user experience is awful.

2 points
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