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Language Learning with RoamResearch

Do you use Roamresearch for learn languages? (English etc.) What method do you follow? what is your advice? Thanks

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#Roam Research #Natural language processing #Learning management system
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brnt's avatar
2 years ago

I'd be curious about this too.

I'm currently using Apple's Notes app to improve my English vocabulary. I have a note where I keep adding new words I learn with a brief definition or synonyms so I can refer back to them.

I've been thinking about migrating this workflow to Roam so I can build my own dictionary over time, with semantically similar words bi-directionally linked and so on.

4 points
emre's avatar
@emre (replying to @brnt )
2 years ago

Thanks for your thoughts. what you think about also Remnote? unknown words can unvisible? this idea good ha? and also SRS system.

2 points
brnt's avatar
@brnt (replying to @emre )
2 years ago

First time I hear about Remnote. Looks like a Roam for mapping flashcards + native SRS capabilities. Very interesting...

2 points
NormanChella's avatar
@NormanChella (via Twitter)
2 years ago

I've considered it, could transfer all my years of Japanese notes over into Roam, combine it with SRS plugins and then practice then.

You can combine the Fluent Forever route and implement any language you're learning into Roam I'm sure

3 points
emre's avatar
@emre (replying to @NormanChella )
2 years ago

Thanks for your thoughts. unkown words unvisilble like remnote. Wouldn't it be better? What you think about it. And also if you have more idea i want to hear these (about learning eng. and/or language)

1 point
NormanChella's avatar
@NormanChella (replying to @emre )
2 years ago

Sure, just some thoughts (I'll copy my responses from Twitter and add extra):

===

When learning any language, context is very important. It not only teaches you how to use a word (in that context), but it also gives you something to remember by. Memorization is amplified by repetition of understanding the phrase or word.

For normal ways of learning languages, we tend to forget the contexts. That's why textbooks suck - they just teach you what words go in each chapter of the book, nothing in real life. You need to go out there and choose your own context, essentially create your own textbook.

If you're importing all your language notes and personal dictionary into Roam, I don't think it's that high of a barrier if you've pre-written the context before importing.

For example, if you've learned words in a specific context (eg. from work, from a speech, etc.) that you know well

Tag them as such and at them to the dictionary

===

For example, translating your journal pages

[[Journal May 12]] -> attempt to translate -> build dictionary from there

Now those words are connected to said context

Or a book in a diff language, aka. that [[book context]]

May be tedious but gradually you get that Roam effect

===

In my case, I associate two contexts for phrases in Japanese: their respective [[kanji]] and their [[context]]

This means two angles of brute-force remembering words in your dictionary

Pair that with bidirectional linking and I think you can map out your language ability :)

===

Really though, the best way to learn a language is:
- Building a Spaced Repetition System (SRS)
- Creating and designing your own contexts to fit them in
- Organize your dictionary by contexts so you know how to use them
- Learn the 65% (most languages have common words, these make up ~65% of daily conversation. Learn those in conjunction with things unique to you)

5 points
emre's avatar
@emre (replying to @NormanChella )
2 years ago

Thanks a lot for your advice. As I understand it. the most important point. create your own system?

2 points
NormanChella's avatar
@NormanChella (replying to @emre )
2 years ago

Yep! Create your own system. The standard textbook education is flawed in that it doesn't cater to how YOU learn a language. Your experiences are different from everyone else's: your routines, the people you meet, where you work, what you're interested in.

If say, you're interested in productivity. Wouldn't it be more fun to learn the same words you see in the productivity space in another language? Fun -> engagement -> contextual understanding -> gradual memory imprint of said vocabulary.

Use the standard resources as a reference for building your system (what words go to which context), learn the most common words used in conversation in PARALLEL with the words that interest you, and put yourself in the relative language environment.

The end goal is to stop thinking in your main language, but to start thinking in that new language whenever you want to speak in that language. That's when you know your brain is wired to understand cultural contexts (but it's a long road, albeit rewarding :) )

2 points
maguay's avatar
2 years ago

I know flash card app Anki is super popular for language learning. For years I've kept an Apple Notes note for both English and Thai where I list new words I discover (after all, language learning is a lifetime pursuit, even with your native tongue). It does seem that Roam's linking could help you figure out word connections more quickly though!

1 point
emre's avatar
@emre (replying to @maguay )
2 years ago

Thanks for your thoughts. SRS system is good for remembering and fresh memorization. how can learn one of language best way for you? listening and/or reading. or all of them. if you have more idea. i want to hear these.

1 point
maguay's avatar
@maguay (replying to @emre )
2 years ago

My experience with second-language learning started fairly young, so I've always found listening to be the best way to learn to talk casually and to learn new words or phrases naturally. You might not get the meaning absolutely correct at first, but if you hear the word in context first and then look it up, you get a better understanding of it. As such, movies and TV (not translated, though, as those always sound "bookish" and stiff) can be one of the best language learning tools. Reading then gives you a more professional, literary take on the language—equally valuable, though less likely to help you feel like you can talk fluently in a language.

3 points
augustbradley's avatar
2 years ago

I also see a ton of potential in the other half of this equation, from the language teaching side. I can envision teachers developing a learning pathway in Roam through the networked relationships that guide a student's language discovery process — with the student having freedom to choose conversational paths.

It could integrate spaced repetition inherent to the circular loops that would inevitably form. I'm envisioning a choose-your-path adventure game. It could have tangents for vocabulary and for grammar, with the main pathways having an immersive conversational quality.

I'm just thinking out loud, don't have it completely mapped out, but effectively it's a way to develop a sort of learning app without having to code a new app. This would enable teachers to build the experience entirely on their own (no developers), lowering the creation bar unleashes a diverse range of experts and implementations such as this.

1 point
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